Summary of the article: “Archivbericht Neuseeland” – 2009

Almost 15 years ago, in 2009, the german archive journal “Archiv, Theorie & Praxis – Zeitschrift für Archivwesen” of North-Rhine Westphalia had published a general overview and introduction of the Aotearoa New Zealand archive system. You can find the article as a .pdf here under this URL online in german language.1

Heusterberg, Babette: Archivbericht Neuseeland, in: Archiv, Theorie & Praxis – Landesverband NRW, 62, 2, 2009, p. 176-182.

With this blogpost, I would like to offer you a brief summary in English language of the article: Archives are an essential part of preserving and providing access to historical records and cultural heritage. The authors explores the archival landscape in Aotearoa New Zealand, with a particular focus on the National Archives /Te Rua Mahara o te Kawanatanga. The article provides an overview of the history of archives in New Zealand, the current state of archives, and the various initiatives that Archives New Zealand has undertaken to improve its services and increase access to its collections.

The history of archives in New Zealand:

The history of archives in New Zealand dates back to the early colonial period, when the first government records were created. However, it was not until the late 19th century that a formal archival system was established. The National Archives of New Zealand was started in 1957 and changed to Archives Aotearoa New Zealand in 2003.

Current state of archives in Aotearoa New Zealand:

The archives in Aotearoa New Zealand are classified into three primary categories, namely government archives, private archives, and community archives. Archives New Zealand is responsible for preserving and providing access to the records of the New Zealand Government and other records of national importance. Then the author describes the various functions of Archives Aotearoa New Zealand which includes appraisal, acquisition, preservation, and access. The article also discusses the obstacles faced by Archives Aotearoa New Zealand, including the limited resources and the necessity to balance access with privacy concerns.

Archives New Zealand initiatives:

Archives Aotearoa New Zealand has undertaken numerous initiatives recently to improve its services and increase access to its collections. These initiatives include the digitisation of records, the development of online finding aids and the creation of partnerships with other institutions. The article also discusses the various outreach programmes that Archives New Zealand has developed to engage with the wider community, such as school programmes and public exhibitions.

Digitisation of records:

Archives Aotearoa New Zealand has undertaken a significant digitisation programme to make its collections more accessible to researchers and the public. The digitisation programme includes the scanning of records, the creation of digital finding aids and the development of online databases. The article notes that while digitisation has many benefits, it also presents challenges, such as the need to ensure the long-term preservation of digital records.

Online finding aids:

Archives Aotearoa New Zealand has developed a range of online finding aids to help researchers navigate its collections. These finding aids include online catalogues, indexes, and guides to specific collections. The article notes that these finding aids have greatly improved access to Archives Aotearoa New Zealand’s collections, but there is still work to be done to ensure that they are comprehensive and up to date.

Partnerships with other institutions:

Archives Aotearoa New Zealand has developed partnerships with other institutions to increase access to its collections and promote the importance of archives. These partnerships include working with museums, libraries, and other cultural institutions. The article notes that these partnerships have been successful in raising awareness of archives and creating new opportunities for research and engagement with the wider community.

Outreach programmes:

Archives Aotearoa New Zealand has developed a range of outreach programmes to engage with the wider community and promote the importance of archives. These programmes include school programmes, public exhibitions and online resources. The article notes that these outreach programmes have been successful in raising awareness of archives and creating new opportunities for engagement with the wider community.

Challenges and future for archives in Aotearoa New Zealand:

Despite the many initiatives undertaken by Archives New Zealand, there are still challenges that need to be addressed to ensure the long-term preservation and accessibility of New Zealand’s documentary heritage. These challenges include limited resources, the need to balance access with privacy concerns, and the need to ensure the long-term preservation of digital records. The article concludes by calling for continued investment in archives and greater collaboration between archives and other cultural institutions to ensure that Aotearoa New Zealand’s documentary heritage is preserved and made accessible to future generations.

  1. Heusterberg, Babette: Archivbericht Neuseeland, in: Archiv, Theorie & Praxis – Landesverband NRW, 62, 2, 2009, p. 176-182. []

GHI London Blogpost

 

Thanks to a scholarship of the German Historical Institute London, I have spent several months of last year (September 2021 to November 2021) in several english cities (Birmingham, London) and welsh cities (Aberystwyth, Pembrokeshire, Milford Haven) in order to undertake archival research in a number of Archives, Museums and Libraries.

In the Cadbury Research Library of the University of Birmingham I was able to read (and to copy) extensive amounts of manuscripts of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) Stations and its actors at the Bay of Islands (roughly from the period between 1814 until 1840). Adopting on one particular meeting minute of the CMS in London, I summarized my PhD research project for the blog of the German Historical Institute. I remain very grateful for this wonderful opportunity of the GHIL and thank Dr. Marcus Meer for the lectoring process.

You can read the blogpost on the GHIL Blog here.1

  1. Hussein, Haureh: Māori Iwi, Quaker Whalers, and Missionaries at the Bay of Islands in Aotearoa/New Zealand (1790–1840), in: GHIL Blog, https://ghil.hypotheses.org/1227 [Last Access: 24.11.2022]. []

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga

During the Conference days of the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology (see the blogpost of 26. Sept. 2022), I met Bill Edwards, manager of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and Dr. James Robinson, Archaeologist of the same Institution.

Dr. James Robinson delivered a paper entitled “Land and Sea,the archaeological and historical evidence of European interaction with tangata whenua on Moturua Island in the Bay of Islands: 1769–1940s”. Bill Edwards talked about the “Seascapes of encounter, the archaeological and historical evidence of European voyagers early contact with tangata whenua in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand.”

Throughout the Conference, I used many occasionaries and moments to have chat with them by a cup of tea, for lunch, or during the boat trip, and even after the Conference, I visited them twice in the Office of the “Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga” in Keri Keri, where we not only continued our conversations but also “fall” into “rabbitholes” of both their Library and their mapping programms in the office.

Apart from Bill and James, John O’Hare, a journalist, also worked in the Council and invited me very spontaneously to talk about my research. I readily used the opportunity to introduce my topic to a local audience. The article can be found in the “Northern Advocate” Newspaper (behind a paywall)1 , but is also free accessible on the blog of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.2

  1. Whaling heritage brings researcher to New Zealand, in: The Northern Advocate, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/northern-advocate/news/bay-news-fleet-celebrates-40-years-okaihau-bowls-on-a-roll/X52EX7N4GOR4EUUGE56LIVJCIE/, [Last Access: 2.11.2022]. []
  2. Whaling Heritage draws researcher to New Zealand, in: Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, https://www.heritage.org.nz/news-and-events/blog/whaling-heritage-draws-researcher-to-new-zealand, [Last Access: 2.11.2022]. []

“He Whenua Rangatira. A Māori land”

This short Youtube clip is part of the exhibition of “He Tohu”. He Tohu has been presented by two leading institutions in Aotearoa/ New Zealand – Archives News Zealand /Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga as well as the National Library of New Zealand / Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa.1

Comprising the time period between 1200 and 1300 and 1839, the video illustrates the first recorded initial Māori settlements on both Islands and both the first European visitors bus also the first Maori travellers outside of Aoetearoa. The brief clip is separted in several ‘chapters’:

1200-1300: Māori arrivals

1300-1500: Pā Sites

1500-1700: Iwi Migrations

1500-1800: Trade routes

1600-1840: European arrivals: Explorers

1600-1840: European arrivals: Missionaries

1600-1840: European arrivals: Whalers

1769-1840: Māori explore the world

1835-183: Signing off He Whakaputanga

He Tohu is a permanent exhibition of three documents, that sustainably changed and formed Aotearoa’s history.2 In 1835, several years after his appointment, and afraid of a potential French annexation, James Busby gathered 34 Māori Rangatira together in order to organize them under the He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni, which is also known as the “Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of New Zealand”.3

The second document, which the exhibition consists of, is the “Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi” of 1840.4

And the “Women’s Suffrage Petition – Te Petihana Whakamana Pōti Wahine” in 1893.5

  1. He Tohu, in: National Library of New Zealand, https://natlib.govt.nz/he-tohu, [last Access: 15.07.2022]. []
  2. See Aotearoa’s founding documents at He Tohu, in: Wellington NZ, https://www.wellingtonnz.com/experience/see-and-do/he-tohu/, [last Access: 15.07.2022]. []
  3. He Whakaputanga, in: National Library of New Zealand, https://natlib.govt.nz/he-tohu/about/he-whakaputanga, [last Access: 15.07.2022]. []
  4. Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi, in: National Library of New Zealand, https://natlib.govt.nz/he-tohu/about/te-tiriti-o-waitangi, [last Access: 15.07.2022]. []
  5. Women’s Suffrage Petition – Te Petihana Whakamana Pōti Wahine, in: National Library of New Zealand, https://natlib.govt.nz/he-tohu/about/womens-suffrage-petition, [last Access: 15.07.2022]. []
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search